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20111001
20111031
STATION
CSPAN2 9
CSPAN 5
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English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2011 8:00am EDT
of cloud computing by the u.s. government. a member of congress who just held a hearing on the topic and an internet executive discuss the benefits and challenges of the government's easing toward cloud computing. >> host: dan lungren is chairman of the homeland security subcommittee on cybersecurity, he is a republican of california, and this week his subcommittee held a hearing on cloud computing. congressman lungren is our guest this week on "the communicators." congressman, is cloud computing for the federal government inevitable? >> guest: it not only is inevitable, it's already part of the mix and one of the serious concerns i have is not that it's inevitable, but the fact that we insure that the security aspects of cloud computing are forecast, are dealt with ahead of time and are incorporated into this new, this new computer world. i mean, cloud computing is part of the new computer world. >> host: jennifer martinez of politico is a technology reporter, she's also joining us this week on "the communicators." >> host: thank you. and the hearing was focused on, like you said, t
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2011 6:30pm EDT
across the u.s. this week, we will look at other perspectives on the issue of lightsquared. now joining us is representative paul broun. he is chairman of the science- space technology subcommittee. you recently held a hearing around lightsquared. what was that hearing about and what did you learn? guest: we have been trying to get information from lightsquared, because the information we have been able to ascertain thus far is that this ground-based broadband network that lightsquared wants to put in place is being fast track through the fcc. and this administration is pushing the fcc to approve ishtsquared's spectrum which adjacent to the gps spectrum. everything that we hear from all lightsquared is that this spectrum, if it is ground-based, is going to interfere with everybody's gps in their cars and interfere with the highly that the gpeseses science and the military community uses. so the high precision gps is probably going to be interviewed byk b-- interfered with lightsquared going ahead. the spectrum was designed for low intensity. it was designed to be a signal broadcast from
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2011 6:30pm EDT
communicators". we look at the future of cloud computing by the u.s. government. a member of congress and internet executive discuss the benefits and challenges of the government easing towards cloud computing. >> dan lungren is chairman of the homeland security committee on cyber security. he is a republican of california and his subcommittee held a hearing on cloud computing. congerssman lungren is our guest on "the communicators.:" i9s cloud computing inevitable? guest: it is already part of the mix. and one of the serious but concerned i have is not that it is inevitable but the fact that we ensure that the security aspects of cloud computing are ahead of time and incorporated into this new computer world. host: jennifer martina's of politico is a technology reporter. she joins us this week. guest: the hearing was focused on the, like his said, the security of cloud computing, and the federal government moving its system towards the cloud. at that hearing you described administration officials touting the benefits of the cloud as glass half full people. and then there was a gao of
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2011 8:00am EDT
squared is trying to build across the u.s. and this week we're going to look at some other perspectives on the issue of lightsquared, and now joining us is representative paul brown. he is the chairman of the science and technology committee. congressman brown, you recently held a hearing around lightsquared. >> guest: we did. >> host: what was that hearing about, and what did you learn? >> guest: well, peter, we have been trying to get information from lightsquared because the information we've been able to ascertain thus far is this ground-based broadband network that lightsquared wants to put in place is being fast tracked through the fcc, and this administration is pushing the fcc to approve light square lightsquared's spectrum. everything that we hear from all the experts is that this spectrum, if it's ground-based -- which it wasn't designed to be -- is going to interfere with everybody's gps in their cars, it's going to interfere, also, with the high, the highly technical gpss that science community utilizes, that the aviation community uses, that particularly the military uses. so the high p
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2011 6:30pm EDT
to commercial agreements among companies, clearing arrangements, and the thing that causes us concern about this is if we look at it in the context of the international arena, we have in europe carriers in europe calling for rules on i.p. interconnection that would allow for them to charge for the delivery of traffic into their countries. the developed world has wanted to establish a system that was similar to what we had in the old voice world, a system of charges for physical delivery to the developed world because they want to collect this money to build the infrastructure. this is something which puts, in essence, old world regulation into the new world. and allows countries to prevent the free flow of information into those countries. and it is really targeted at our internet companies in the u.s. we provide the content, they provide the search. we have the amazon, we have netflix. we are the ones sending traffic. at that want to charge us. it is in part to collect money from u.s. companies. when you look at it in that context, we have to be careful about what we do domestically and se
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2011 8:00am EDT
, a company that is trying to build a wireless broadband network across the u.s. mr. ahuja discusses the science, engineering, cost and political challenges of building the network. as well as concerns that lightsquared's technology may it with gps global positioning equipment. >> sanjiv ahuja is the chairman and ceo of a company called lightsquared. mr. ahuja, what is lightsquared and what do you do? >> guest: thanks for inviting me to the show. cecilia, thank you very much for being here, and good morning to both of you. what lightsquared is trying to do is gain nationwide industrial broadband network, working with our satellite. that will enable americans coast-to-coast for the first time every square inch of american soil will be able to be connected, whether it is hawaii, alaska, california, maine, the florida. if you can look at the american sky, you can talk on a phone. and for the first time, americans will have access to conductivity, even if there are natural disasters and other things happening through our satellite network. we are building a network which is going to be t
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2011 6:30pm EDT
that there was a dramatic increase in the which is cyber activity targeting u.s. information and networks, including a more than tripling of the volume of melissa software since 2009. who is installing the software and what kind of damage is it doing? guest: it could be any number of factors that direct the federal systems. these actors can include nation states, criminal groups or organizations, hackers, potentially terrorists. in some instances, insiders, employers and government contractors either knowingly or unwittingly installing this malicious software. is a jill itorro senior reporter with the "washington business journal." guest: you said that the number of security incidents that agency's report has increased 650%. that is a huge number. i know a lot of times that is explained by better detection. theirs is -- there are quite a lot of incidents that go unnoticed. how should we look at that number? guest: clearly, it is a dramatic increase in the number of incidents from fiscal year 2006 through 2010. the number increased from 5500 to 41,000 security incidents. a 650% increase. 10% of thoughse in
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2011 8:00am EDT
testified that there had been a dramatic increase in malicious cyber activity targeting u.s. computers and networks -- >> host: who's installing this software, and what kind of damage does it do? >> guest: it can be any number of actors that do that. the threats to federal systems are growing and evolving, and these actors can include nation states, it can include criminal groups or organizations, hackers, potentially terrorists. and be in some instances, insiders, employees and government contractors either knowingly or unwittingly installing these types of malicious software: >> host: and we'll explore that a little bit later. but jill aitoro is also with us, she's a senior reporter with the washington business journal. >> host: thank you for joining us. >> guest: thank you. >> host: one thing i noticed in the report is that you said that the number of security incidents that agencies report has increased 650%. um, that's a huge number. i know a lot of times that's explained by better detection, ask i know there's also quite a lot of security incidents that go unnoticed. so how shoul
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2011 8:00pm EDT
a wireless broadband network across the u.s.. he discusses the science, engineering, costs, and political challenges of building the network as well as concerns that light square technology may interfere with gps globalling positioning equipment. >> host: sanjiv ahuja is the ceo of light scared. what do you do? >> guest: peter, thank you for inviting me to the show, and good morning to both of you. what we're trying to do is build a network working with our satellite. that will enable americans, coast to coast, for the first time every square inch of american soil will be able to be connected whether it's hawaii, alaska, california, maine, to florida. if you can look at the american sky, you can talk on a phone, and for the first time, americans will have access to connectivity even if there are natural disasters and other things happening through our satellite network. now, we are building a network that's going to be the most comprehensive network using 4th generation technology built to-date, but complement to the satellite we launched last year, it's the largest commercial satellite e
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2011 6:30pm EDT
of lightsquared and a spectrum we're using today. the spectrum was allocated in 1989. that is a time when there was no option. companies were going in getting the spectrum as they needed it. a lot of the current wireless large operators came into existence at the time. this spectrum was originally allocated for satellite purposes. in early 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, under republican and ministrations -- administrations, getting permission to build a terrestrial network, working in conjunction with the satellite network. gps manufacturers participated in the process and supported the process. we made comments on our network design. we talked about how we live as good neighbors, because gps spectrum is next door to the lightsquared spectrum. we defined rules that lightsquared will not transmitted to the dps spectrum. that required us to make -- the gps spectrum. that requires us to make a big wall on our site. in 2010, when you're asking for a change of control, when we required the predecessor company to lightsquared, called skyterra, the fcc mandated as to build a network at a rate no compan
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2011 8:00pm EDT
in malicious cyberactivity, targeting u.s. computers and networks including a more than tripling of the volume of malicious software since 2009. who is installing the software and what kind of damage does it do? >> guest: he can be a number of factors. the threats to the federal systems are growing and evolving and these factors can include nations states. they include criminal groups or organizations, hackers, potentially terrorists and in some instances insiders. employees and government contractors come either knowingly or unwittingly installing these types of malicious software. >> host: we will explore that a little bit later but jill aitoro is a senior reporter with the "washington business journal." >> guest: thank you for joining us. one thing i noticed in the report is that he said that the number of security incidents that agencies report have increased to 650%. that is a huge number. i know a lot of time -- better detection and there's also a lot that goes unnoticed. how should we look at that number? is it as scary as it appears to be? >> guest: clearly it is a dramatic increase in
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)